The OE History Nights in Portland and Troutdale

Click here for History Nights in Bend

The Oregon Encyclopedia hosts a series of History Nights in collaboration with McMenamins pubs. Come join us for good beer and food and find out more about the history and culture of our state from OE authors. Bring your encyclopedia-worthy Oregon stories to share with the OE Editors-in-Chief and check back to see dates for more OE History Nights at a McMenamins near you.

   Elephant

   Klondike Kate

   Goose Hollow

   Chemawa

   Pauling

   Glaciers

   Alameda

   Missoula Floods 2

  Mulugeta Seraw

  Mayor Larsson

  Dave Beck

   1912 Homosexual Controversy

   Lewis & Clark

  Soccer City

  Basques

  The Roots of Beervana

   Vancouver Barracks

hoyt

missoula floods

homer

moorhouse

eliot

east county

houses

wapato

audubon

Nisei

pollution

geer

wpa

PAM

amusement parks

doris

Asahel

Sandy

confluence

fishing

Fort Vancouver

bennes

Fort Vancouver

plants poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mona Bell"A Woman Alone: Mona Bell, Sam Hill, and the Mansion on Bonneville Rock”
Presented by John Harrison

Tuesday, February 28, 2012
6:30 p.m.
McMenamins Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.
Free and open to the public

For 15 months beginning in early 1934, Mona Bell, a mistress of the flamboyant, visionary entrepreneur Sam Hill, fought the Army over its condemnation of her hilltop mansion in the Columbia River Gorge 40 miles east of Portland to make way for Bonneville Dam. Hill, whose lasting works include Maryhill Museum and the Old Columbia River Highway, built the house in 1928 for Mona; that same year, their child, a boy, was born in Portland. Newly evicted but also newly wealthy, Mona set off on a peripatetic life as a pennypinching recluse at a cabin on a remote lake in northern Minnesota, a world traveler who flaunted her wealth, and a difficult mother to the son she named Sam.

John Harrison, who wrote a biography of Mona, will discuss her life, her unusual relationship with Sam Hill and his cousin, Edgar, and the federal court proceedings that included then-Governor Julius Meyer, a friend of Sam, as a witness on her behalf. Harrison is a former newspaper reporter and, since 1990, Information Officer at the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, an energy-planning agency based in Portland. He is the author of an almanac-style history of the Columbia River that is posted on the Council’s website, www.nwcouncil.org/history. He also authored or co-authored several entries in the Oregon Encyclopedia. He has a bachelor’s degree in communications from Washington State University and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Oregon.
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Lincoln

"Abraham Lincoln and the American West During the Civil War Era"
Presented by Richard Etulain

Monday, February 13, 2012
McMenamins Mission Theater
1624 NW Glisan, Portland

7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m.

More than 16,000 books have been published about Abraham Lincoln, many more than on any other American. Unfortunately, none deals thoroughly with Lincoln and Oregon. Richard Etulain, professor emeritus at the University of New Mexico, has published extensively on Abraham Lincoln. He is the author of Lincoln Looks West (2010), and a new study of Lincoln and the Oregon Country (forthcoming). Etulain will discuss how even though Lincoln spent little time west of the Mississippi, he was, as president, closely connected to the West and Oregon.  Several of Lincoln's close friends moved to the Pacific Northwest and acquainted him with the course of regional politics. The transcontinental railroad, a homestead act, and a college land-grant act—all of which Lincoln supported—also clearly affected the West. But it was in politics where we find Lincoln’s clearest and strongest connections to the West and Oregon. In several ways, Abraham Lincoln was one of Oregon’s political founding fathers.

Richard W. Etulain is the author or editor of 50 books, most of them on the American West. He holds the PhD from the University of Oregon and has taught at Northwest Nazarene University, Idaho State University, and most recently at the University of New Mexico. He is past president of both the Western Literature and Western History associations. He is currently researching a book on Calamity Jane.
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Bridge of the GOds

“The Bridge of the Gods: Folklore, Forests, and Floods.”
Presented by Jim O'Connor (USGS)

Tuesday, November 28, 2011
6:30 pm
McMenamins Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.
Free and open to the public

In the heart of the Columbia River Gorge at Cascade Locks, 45 miles east of Portland, the 1800-foot-long bridge spanning the Columbia River is known as the Bridge of the Gods. The name derives from a much larger Bridge of the Gods that blocked the Columbia River in about 1450 AD. The earlier “bridge” was the result of the Bonneville Landslide, which almost certainly gave rise to the Native American story of the Bridge of the Gods. Oral histories of the region indicate that the Native Americans “could cross the river without getting their feet wet.” Geologist Jim O’Connor talks about this remarkable landmark and how it became part of the Oregon story.

 

 

 

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civil war
"The Pacific Northwest & The American Civil War"
Presented by Greg Shine, Chief Ranger and Historian, Fort Vancouver, NPS

Monday, December 5
McMenamins Mission Theater
7:00 pm, doors open at 6:00 pm
1624 NW Glisan, Portland
Free and open to the public

Fort Vancouver was an important base of operations for the U.S. Army just prior to the Civil War. Captain Ulysses S. Grant arrived in 1852 to facilitate the settlement of the Northwest by establishing posts, building roads, and outfitting surveying expeditions. When war broke out, he and the other professional soldiers stationed at the Fort were sent east, and their positions were filled by hundreds of volunteers. Their Civil War task: to control the Native populations and secure the land for the Union and its sympathizers. The Northwest played an interesting role in the Civil War—not only because its states and territories were part of the ongoing battle over freedom and slavery—but also because of the army's particular relationship with the region's Native American groups. Chief Ranger Greg Shine describes the Civil War period in the Northwest, the significant people and events that influenced the outcome, and the role memory plays in our understanding of the Civil War, 150 years after the first shot.

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Past OE History Nights

CRH“The Historic Columbia River Highway: A Study of its History, Decline, and Preservation.” (Film)
Presented by Robert Hadlow, Dave Sell, and George Fekaris

Tuesday, October 25, 2011
6:30 pm
McMenamins Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.
Free and open to the public

When the Columbia River Highway was completed in 1922, it became the first modern highway in the
Pacific Northwest and the first scenic highway in the United States. Thanks to the efforts of businessman Samuel Hill and architect Samuel C. Lancaster, the highway was an engineering marvel, enhanced by the graceful masonry and bridge construction Lancaster added to his design. Beginning in the 1930s, however, increased traffic forced a new route along the Columbia, bypassing much of the original highway and leaving much of it to fall into disrepair. An effort to restore the old highway and its spectacular views of the Gorge began in the 1980s, and it was named a National Historic Landmark in 2000. Today, the highway is the focus of a comprehensive preservation program by the Oregon Department of Transportation. Robert Hadlow, Senior Historian for ODOT, and Dave Sell and George Fekaris, transportation planners for the Federal Highway Administration, will tell the story of the highway and outline the future of this historic roadway.
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Flood“High Water: Portland in the Flood of 1894”
Presented by Dan Haneckow

Monday, October 17, 2011
7:00 pm, doors open at 6:00 pm
McMenamins Mission
1624 NW Glisan, Portland

Free and open to the public

On May 27, 1894, the rising Willamette River began to flow into the streets of Portland. For one month, Portland, already reeling from the financial crash of 1893, was inundated by floodwaters. City life came to a halt, then adapted with flotillas of small boats for shopping and spindly bridges that spanned between second floors. Fire engines were towed through the streets on barges, and the bars moved onto rafts. The receding water left the city a hellish, stinking mess. Dan Haneckow explores Portland of the 1890s and its watery ordeal with stunning images of the “Metropolis of the Northwest” as it dealt with one of its greatest challenges.

Dan Haneckow writes about Portland, the Northwest, and transportation topics. He arrived in Oregon from Newport, Rhode Island, after his parents chose to retire in Klamath Falls following a career with the U.S. Navy. He has lived in Portland since 1990. His projects include presentations at the Architectural Heritage Center of the Bosco Milligan Foundation, the Car Free Cities conference held in Portland in 2008, and Winterail in 2004. His work has appeared in Trains Magazine and Pacific Rail News. He writes about Portland History in a blog called Cafe Unknown.
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salmon“The 13,000-year history of Columbia River salmon”
Presented by Dr. Virginia L. Butler

Tuesday, September 27, 2011
6:30 pm
McMenamins Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.
Free and open to the public

For thousands of years, Native people who lived on the Columbia took advantage of the abundant fish in the river. Virginia Butler, a cultural anthropologist from Portland State University and specialist in aboriginal fisheries, will describe what she and other researchers have discovered in seventy-five archeological sites in the Columbia river basin. Those archaic fish remains dating to the past 13,000 years provide an unparalleled record of fish abundance and distribution in the river system and reveal surprising answers to the questions, what kind of fish did people gather on the river and what has happened to those species? Dr. Butler joins scientific research with historic and contemporary records to highlight the long and enduring connection between fish and indigenous people in the Pacific Northwest.


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southern oregon poster“How Southern Oregon Got Its Ornery Streak: The Politics of Dissonance and
Resentment.”
Presented by Dr. Jeff LaLande

Monday, September 26, 2011
7:00 pm, doors open at 6:00 pm
McMenamins Mission, 1624 NW Glisan, Portland
Free and open to the public

“What’s the matter with Southern Oregon?” Why are residents of the Portland area so often surprised—even shocked—by the politics to the south? Dating from before statehood to the present day, Southern Oregon’s conservative-populist politics have made for a distinctive and often “ornery” reputation. Jeff LaLande’s illustrated talk will explore the reasons for this tradition—from the region’s pro-Southern attitudes during the Civil War, its support for populist third parties (including the 1920s Ku Klux Klan), to a dramatic political insurrection during the Great Depression and the State of Jefferson “secession” movement of the 1940s.


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Fremont posterFinding Fremont in Oregon: 1843 (film) TAKE TWO
A film by Loren Irving
With a presentation by Dr. Bill Lang

Tuesday, August 30, 6:30
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.

Due to technical difficulties at our July History Night, we are bringing the film Finding Fremont in Oregon back to Edgefield on August 30.

In the winter of 1843, Brevet Lt. John C. Frémont led an expedition of 27 men south of the Columbia River and into unmapped portions of Oregon. With cartographer Charles Preuss and scout Kit Carson, Frémont and his expedition provided the nation with detailed maps of important sections of the Oregon Country just as overland migrants flooded into the region. Retracing Frémont’s steps, photographer Loren Irving spent nearly a year photographing all 31 of Frémont’s campsites in Oregon. Through the words of the expedition’s journals, stunning photography, and original music, this 30-minute documentary chronicles Frémont’s expedition as it moved through Oregon and into history. Following the film, Dr. Bill Lang discusses how knowledge about 19th century exploration of Oregon sheds light on 20th century land use decisions and our understanding of the importance of cartography in western history.
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Fremont posterFinding Fremont in Oregon: 1843 (film)
Presented by Loren Irving and Kelly Cannon-Miller

Tuesday, July 26, 6:30
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.

In the winter of 1843, Brevet Lt. John C. Frémont led an expedition of 27 men south of the Columbia River and into unmapped portions of Oregon. With cartographer Charles Preuss and scout Kit Carson, Frémont and his expedition provided the country with the maps needed for settlement of the West.

Retracing Frémont’s steps, photographer Loren Irving spent nearly a year photographing all 31 of Frémont’s campsites in Oregon. Through the words of the expedition’s journals, stunning photography, and original music, this 30-minute documentary chronicles Frémont’s expedition as it moved through Oregon and into history.  Join Loren as he hosts this amazing tale of Fremont, Kit Carson, Billy Chinook and 23 other men, 104 horses and mules, and the 223-pound cannon they dragged along for 400 miles.

Produced in partnership with photographer Loren Irving, Sandy Cummings of TVStoryteller and the Deschutes County Historical Society, funding for the documentary provided through the generous support of the Bend Foundation and the Starview Foundation.

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Woody Guthrie"Roll on Columbia: Woody Guthrie and the Columbia River Songs"
Film screening and musical tribute to Guthrie by local musicians

Monday, July 25
Bagdad Theater & Pub
3702 SE Hawthorne Blvd.

6 p.m. doors, 7 p.m. event
$5 per person
Minor with parent or guardian

Join us for this musical  and visual tribute to Guthrie by local musicians with a screening of the documentary film by oral historian & radio/video producer Michael O’Rourke, with a Q&A with the filmmaker. Michael O'Rourke's documentary depicts the remarkable story of songwriter Woody Guthrie's time in Portland working for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in 1941, and the discovery 40 years later of a collection of Guthrie's BPA recordings about the Columbia River.

Historical photos, scenes from the 1948 BPA film "River of Power," and interviews with Guthrie's wife, Mary, famed folklorist Alan Lomax, and Steve Kahn, Guthrie's BPA manager, highlight the film.
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glaciers"A Scene of Ice and Snow: the Discovery and Study of Glaciers"
Presented by Dr. Andrew Fountain

Tuesday, June 28, 6:30
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.

When the USGS sent a team of explorers and geologists into the West in 1871, none of Oregon’s over 400 glaciers were yet on a map. We know more about the state’s glaciers now, and the study of them tells us much about the region’s environmental history and the impact of both climate and human populations on the snowfields high above us. Geologist, geographer, and modern mountain man Dr. Andrew Fountain joins us this month to talk about the Oregon landscape since the Little Ice Age, and how people have explored, mapped, and enjoyed the coldest parts of the state.

 



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The OE History Night in Bend

dams poster
"At the Crossroads: The 1946 Decision to Stop Building Dams on the Columbia River."

Presented by Dr. William L. Lang

Tuesday, June 28, 6:00 p.m.
Old St. Francis School
700 N.W. Bond Street, Bend

In 1946, the Department of the Interior issued a ten-year moratorium on building dams below the site of McNary Dam on the Columbia River. The moratorium was a response to concerns by biologists and Native and commercial fishers who were concerned about the health of the salmon fisheries on the river. Within a short eighteen-month period, however, Interior made a complete turn-around and began to build dams in earnest. William L. Lang, an environmental historian and expert on the Columbia, explains why the moratorium was reversed, who was involved, and what was—and still is—at stake.

 

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preservation"The Greatest Place: how preservationists and policymakers are saving Oregon history."
A Special Panel Presentation

Sunday, June 12, 2011, 1 p.m.
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse
4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road, Hillsboro

Join The Oregon Encyclopedia for a special panel presentation on historical preservation on Sunday, June 12th, 1pm, at the McMenamins Cornelius Pass Roadhouse barn. Val Ballestrem from the Architectural Heritage Center, Peggy Moretti from the Historic Preservation League of Oregon, John Williams from Metro, and a representative from the Beaverton Main Street Program will present on their diverse approaches to preservation efforts in the city, the suburbs, and the state, including a discussion on how the Urban Growth Boundary affects preservation and conservation. A question-and-answer session will follow. Learn about the many ways preservationists and policymakers work to keep Oregon’s built environment intact, what challenges they face, and what their efforts have to do with our history—and what it means to live in the Greatest Place.


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Guthrie photoWoody Guthrie in the Pacific Northwest: the Lost Songs.
Presented by Michael O'Rourke

Tuesday, April 26, 6:30 p.m.McMenamins Edgefield 2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.

Seventy years ago, folksinger Woody Guthrie spent one month in the Northwest traveling up and down the Columbia River writing songs for the Bonneville Power Administration. The songs he wrote during that short stay in 1941 still resonate in the Northwest and compel us to claim Guthrie for our own. While his most famous song from that time, “Roll On, Columbia,” is Washington State’s official folk song, many of the songs Guthrie wrote while he was in Portland were lost to the public for many years.

In the mid-1980s, BPA employee Bill Murlin rediscovered Guthrie’s Columbia River songs and worked with oral historian and producer Michael O’Rourke to create a radio documentary for OPB, broadcasting many of the songs for the first time. O’Rourke turned this radio documentary into a film, including interviews with people who knew and worked with Guthrie. That film will be debuted publicly at The Oregon Encyclopedia History Night on Tuesday, April 26, 6:30pm, at the McMenamin’s Edgefield Power Station. Bill Murlin will be on hand to talk about his discovery of the lost songs and to play his guitar.

Please join The Oregon Encyclopedia to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Woody Guthrie’s month in Portland with this tribute to a man who put the Columbia River and the Northwest to music. Free and open to the public, all ages welcome. Food, beer, and wine available during the film and performance.
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Timbers posterSoccer Team, USA: The Birth and Rise of the Portland Timbers.
Presented by Michael ORR

Tuesday, March 29, 6:30 p.m.
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.


The Oregon Encyclopedia gives a nod to Timbers fever with this
presentation on the history of Portland's soccer franchise. Michael Orr takes a look back at the first season of the Timbers team in 1975, a season so successful that it landed the Timbers in the NASL Soccer Bowl and earned Portland the nickname "Soccer City USA." Learn more about the team that inspired huge crowds and featured stars like Peter Withe and Willie Anderson.

Michael Orr is managing writer and editor for FC Media, a
Portland-based research company focused on soccer club history. He hosts the weekly radio program mao's Football Show on Cascadia.FM and has contributed articles for the Portland Timbers Fan's History, The Blizzard Magazine, and is currently writing a history of the 1975 Portland Timbers season.
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bryant reed poster“‘I’ve found her at last.’ The Love Affair of 20th Century Portland: John Reed and Louise Bryant.” Presented by Michael Munk

Tuesday, February 22, 6:30 p.m.
McMenamins Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, Ore.


The Oregon Encyclopedia kicks off its first OE History Night of 2011 with a love story. In the winter of 1914, political activist and writer John Reed made what would be his last trip to Portland, his hometown. At a dinner party, Reed met artist and activist Louise Bryant, and they were immediately smitten with each other. “I’ve found her at last,” Reed wrote. The couple moved to New York, and from there to Russia, where they reported on the revolution for American papers and periodicals. Their love story has stayed with us—a mixture of romance and revolution—in journals and books, and in the movies (Reds). But it started here, in a Portland drawing room.

Michael Munk retired after teaching political science for more than twenty-five years, most recently at Rutgers University. He is author of The Portland Red Guide: Sites & Stories of Our Radical Past (Ooligan Press, 2007).
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Football

A Special Sports Edition of The OE History Night
Thursday, December 2, 2010
7:45 pm (doors open at 7:15)
McMenamins Mission Theater
Free, minors with parents welcome

Kerry Eggers presents “Beavers v. Ducks: Over 100 Years of Civil War”

The Oregon Civil War—one of the country’s longest-standing rivalries in college football—will rage again on Saturday, December 4th. For over 100 years, the Oregon State Beavers and the University of Oregon Ducks have been meeting on football fields up and down the Willamette Valley, inspiring the unflagging loyalty of generations of Oregonians. Sports writer Kerry Eggers traces the annual game to its beginnings (in 1893), looks back at ten of the top Civil War games of all time, and talks about how the Civil War has become such an important part of our state’s sporting culture.

Kerry Eggers has been writing sports professionally since he arrived in Portland in 1975. The Corvallis native and Oregon State graduate worked for the Oregon Journal from 1975 to 1982, the Oregonian from 1982 to 2000, and has been with the Portland Tribune since 2001. A four-time Oregon Sports Writer of the Year, he has written four books, including Wherever You May Be: The Bill Schonely Story, and Clyde the Glide: The Clyde Drexler Story. He is a former president of the U.S. Track and Field Writers of America.
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Mt. Hood Freeway posterThe OE History Night
November 30, 2010, 6:30pm
Edgefield

“Next Exit Concrete Forest: The Mt. Hood Freeway Story.” Presented by Val Ballestrem.

In the 1960s, city planners had their eyes on a highway running from the Marquam Bridge through southeast Portland up to SE 122nd Avenue in an attempt to speed traffic to Mt. Hood. By 1974, the freeway plan had all but died, having met opposition from residents, environmental groups, and proponents of public transportation (led by Neil Goldschmidt). Val Ballestrem traces the origins of both the original freeway plan and the protest against it, and connects the debate to Portland’s present landscape.  

Val Ballestrem is an independent historian and the education manager for the Bosco-Milligan Foundation/Architectural Heritage Center in Portland. A life-long Oregonian, he has a master’s degree in western U.S. history and public history from Portland State University.
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Tillamook ForestThe OE History Night
November 16, 2010, 7pm
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse

“Tillamook Forest: Past, Present & Future.” Presented by Doug Decker.

Come hear how the landscape of the Tillamook State Forest has been shaped over time and how the forest, in turn, has shaped generations of Oregonians—many who remember the Tillamook simply as “The Burn.” Using writings, oral history interviews, photographs, maps, and stories from those who have known and shaped the forest over many years, Doug Decker will portray the dramatic changes of the 20th Century and sketch how that legacy shapes the future of the Tillamook State Forest.




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Monroe SweetlandThe OE History Night
Tuesday, October 26, 2010. 6:30pm
Edgefield, Troutdale
 

Dr. William Robbins presents “Finding Monroe Sweetland: ‘One of the Original Western Democrats.’”

One of the Oregon’s most prominent political actors, Monroe Sweetland wore many hats in his time, including Oregon Democratic National Committeeman, state representative, newspaper publisher, and teacher. Historian Bill Robbins, an expert on the life and career of Sweetland, shares with us his most recent research on the man many consider to be responsible for the remarkable success of the Democratic Party in mid-century Oregon.

 

 


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Civil War posterThe OE History Night
Tuesday, October 19, 2010, 7:00pm
McMenamins Cornelius Pass Roadhouse

“It’s War! Beavers vs. Ducks: the History of the Longest—and Greatest—Sports Rivalry in Oregon,” presented by Kerry Eggers.

On December 4th  the Oregon State Beavers and the University of Oregon Ducks will meet at Reser Stadium in Corvallis to play the 114th renewal of the Civil War, one of the longest-standing rivalries in college football. Sports writer Kerry Eggers traces the annual game to its beginnings (in 1893), looks back at five of the top Civil War games of all time, and talks about how the Civil War has become such an important part of our state’s sporting culture. Historical images of past Civil War match-ups from the U of O and OSU photo archives will be part of the presentation.



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The Dill Pickle ClubOE History Night
Tuesday, September 21, 7pm
McMenamins Cornelius Pass Roadhouse, Hillsboro

The Dill Pickle Club presents
“Know Your City: Examining Portland's forgotten history” with a presentation on the X-Ray Café by Sarah Mirk.

The Oregon Encyclopedia is pleased to invite The Dill Pickle Club—a civic organization that organizes educational projects on local history, culture, and civics—to talk about Oregon History Comics with author and Portland Mercury reporter Sarah Mirk. Marc Moscato and Kyle Von Hoetzendorff will present an illustrated lecture on their "Forgotten Histories" programs, followed by journalist and historian Sarah Mirk on the group’s latest comic featuring Portland’s X-Ray Café, one of the places important to the region’s alternative music scene in the 1990s. She will discuss how the club develops and writes the comics series and what it’s like to work with ten artists to illustrate little known parts of our Oregon history.

Marc Moscato is an artist, curator, and activist living in Portland, where he directs The Dill Pickle Club. His short films and videos have screened at film festivals, theaters, and nontraditional spaces across the country.

Sarah Mirk is a reporter for the Portland Mercury and editor of the forthcoming 10-issue series of Oregon History Comics, a collaboration with the Dill Pickle Club.

The Dill Pickle Club organizes educational projects that help us understand the place in which we live. Through tours, public programs, and publications, we create nontraditional and interactive learning environments where all forms of knowledge are valued and made readily accessible. Founded in 2009, the club is a volunteer-run organization with a shared belief in the vitality of community education and democracy.
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Dorothea Lange photographA Special OE History Night in Partnership with The Washington County Historical Society.
Tuesday, August 24, 7:00 pm
McMenamins Cornelius Pass Roadhouse, Hillsboro

“Slices of Cinema on Dorothea Lange and the Great Depression,” presented by David Milholland and David Horowitz.

In 1939, photographer Dorothea Lange came to Oregon to document the lives of migrant workers for the Farm Security Administration, taking over 500 photographs. The Washington County Historical Society is currently exhibiting some of these images, and filmmaker David Milholland and the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission have created a film, "Slices of Cinema on Dorothea Lange and the Great Depression.” Join us for a look at scenes from one of the movies examined in the film (The Grapes of Wrath) and a slideshow of many of Lange's iconic photographs of Depression-Era Oregon, accompanied by dramatic readings of Lange's own notes and captions by Dr. David Horowitz and historian Gloria Myers.
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Buffalo Soldiers posterOE History Night
Tuesday, August 31, 6:30pm
McMenamins Edgefiled, Troutdale

 “Buffalo Soldiers in the Northwest,” presented by Greg Shine, Chief Ranger at Fort Vancouver

In April 1899, the first African American regiment to serve out of Fort Vancouver arrived to train and provide military support to the northwest region. Company B of the Twenty-fourth U.S. Infantry Regiment was one of four African American Regiments, known as Buffalo Soldiers, within the armed forces sent to guard the railroads and impose martial law, among other duties. They also created a rich social life that included dances and baseball games. Chief Ranger Greg Shine presents his research on race and the military within the Vancouver Barracks, with a look at some of the members of the regiment who left their mark on the community they served.
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Multnomah County Poor FarmTuesday, July 27, 2010, 6:30 pm
Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey Street
Troutdale
Click here for a Google Map

“Mother Always Said I'd End Up in the Poor Farm,” a presentation by Sharon Nesbit
 
Originally, and for its first seven decades, Edgefield was Multnomah County’s Poor Farm, conceived in the spirit of “back to the land” progressivism that characterized early twentieth-century social welfare projects. At its peak, the poor farm was home to more than 600 residents, many of whom worked the institution’s 345 acres of Troutdale farmland. Its size and success are key factors for its inclusion onto the National Register of Historic Places.  Sharon Nesbit, a pivotal figure in saving the property from demolition, will vividly trace Edgefield–and its remarkable cast of characters–from poor farm to county nursing home to abandoned eyesore to the wonderfully unorthodox destination resort it has become. 
 
Sharon Nesbit is a former historian and founder of the Troutdale Historical Society. She is a columnist and reporter for the Gresham Outlook and a member of the committee that worked to save the former Multnomah County Poor Farm, now McMenamins Edgefield. She is author of Vintage Edgefield, A History of the Multnomah County Poor Farm, first published in 1995, and a centennial history of Troutdale published in 2007, entitled, It Could Have Been Carpdale. She is vice president of the Oregon Geographic Names Board.
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Suffrage posterA Special OE History Night: we've partnered with the Oregon Woman Suffrage Centennial!
"Oregon Women Vote: What's Suffrage Got To Do With It?"
Presented by Kimberly Jensen and the Suffrage Players
Tuesday, July 20, 2010, 5:30; presentation on the history of woman suffrage at 7pm.
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse

4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road Hillsboro
Click here for a Google Map 

 “Oregon Women Vote: What's Suffrage Got To Do With It?” presented by Kimberly Jensen and the Suffrage Players

Many women and men in Oregon fought for the right of woman suffrage, or the right to vote, for more than four decades in the 19th and 20th centuries. Historian Kimberly Jensen reveals the fascinating history of the spirited leaders, contentious tactics, and ultimate victory that won votes for women of Oregon in 1912—a full eight years before the 19th Amendment granted that right to women of the nation! The Suffrage Players will bring that history to life drawing from actual arguments made for and against woman suffrage in 1912. They might even sing. 

Kimberly Jensen teaches history and gender studies at Western Oregon University. Dr. Jensen is the author of Mobilizing Minerva: American Women in the First World War, “‘Neither Head Nor Tail to the Campaign’: Esther Pohl Lovejoy and the Oregon Woman Suffrage Victory of 1912” in the Fall 2007 issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly, and “Revolutions in the Machinery: Oregon Women and Citizenship in Sesquicentennial Perspective” in the Fall 2009 issue of the OHQ. She is writing a biography of Esther Lovejoy, M.D., Oregon suffragist and public health activist. The Suffrage Players are a newly formed troupe of 21st century suffragists.
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McCarthyismTuesday, June 29, 2010, 6:30pm
Edgefield

2126 SW Halsey Street
Troutdale
Click here for a Google Map

"The Experience and Legacy of McCarthyism in Oregon," presented by Dr. Michael Munk

Learn more about one of Portland’s most politically contentious eras—when the radicals and the Red Squad battled it out in a city changed dramatically by World War II when a labor force was built almost overnight in Kaiser’s enormous shipping yards. The history of radicalism in Portland is long, and the radical politics that took hold of Portland during the “Red Decade” of the 1930s resulted in a pushback by local police departments and elected officials, influenced by McCarthyism and federal Cold War policy, that extended into the 1960s.

Michael Munk retired after teaching political science for more than twenty-five years, most recently at Rutgers University. He is author of The Portland Red Guide: Sites & Stories of Our Radical Past (Ooligan Press, 2007).

 
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Women and Rock MusicTuesday, June 22, 2010, 7pm.
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse

4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road Hillsboro
Click here for a Google Map

"Women and Rock Music: how Oregon turns girls into Rock Stars." Presented by Mina Carson and Susan Shaw.

Women have always been part of the Northwest’s vibrant music scene—from jazz to classical to rock and roll. Two experts on women in rock and roll tell the stories of how Oregon became such an important part of the rock and roll scene for women. The Northwest has helped build the careers of girl bands with institutions like the Rock N Roll Camp for Girls in Portland, enrolling future girl rockers ages 7 to 18.

Mina Carson is an assistant professor of American social and cultural history at Oregon State University. She teaches courses on the Progressive and New Deal eras, women in the twentieth century, American families, gay and lesbian movements, and the history of psychotherapy. She is also an accomplished musician and in 2004 co-authored Girls Rock: Fifty Years of Women Making Music.

Susan M. Shaw is the director of the Women Studies Program at Oregon State University and coauthor of Women’s Voices, Feminist Visions: Classic and Contemporary Readings. She also coauthored Girls Rock: Fifty Years of Women Making Music.
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The Great Light WayThe OE History Night
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 6:30 pm
Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey Street
Troutdale
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"The Great Light Way and the Third Streeters," presented by Dan Haneckow

In 1914, enterprising businessmen unveiled an architectural and electrical wonder along Portland's downtown Third Street—"The Great Light Way." The transformation of the street marked an important turning point in the development of downtown Portland, as bridge and road-building increasingly affected the shape of the Westside business district. Dan Haneckow, an expert on transportation and historic architecture, presents on this fascinating—and illuminating—topic.

Dan Haneckow writes about Portland, the Northwest, and transportation topics. He arrived in Oregon from Newport, Rhode Island, after his parents chose to retire in Klamath Falls following a career with the U.S. Navy. He has lived in Portland since 1990. His projects include presentations at the Architectural Heritage Center of the Bosco Milligan Foundation, the Car Free Cities conference held in Portland in 2008, and Winterail in 2004. His work has appeared in Trains Magazine and Pacific Rail News. He writes about Portland History in a blog called Cafe Unknown: http://www.cafeunknown.com/.
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Jazz in PortlandThe OE History Night
Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 7 pm
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse
4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road Hillsboro
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"The History of Portland's Jazz Scene," presented by Dr. Bill Lang, with a live performance by the Opposite Sextets, introduced by Darrell Grant.

Jazz in Portland grew out of the communities that were created by African Americans who came to the region during World War II to work in the shipbuilding works along the Willamette River. Jazz clubs dominated the Williams Avenue neighborhood in north Portland, and its vibrant music scene attracted and produced some of the greatest jazz musicians in the business. Learn more about the cultural history of jazz in Portland from Dr. Bill Lang, historian at Portland State University, and stay for live music by the Opposite Sextet, a hot, all-female jazz group, introduced by the incomparable Darrell Grant.
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From soil to cask to glassThe OE History Night
Tuesday, April 27, 2010, 6:30pm
Edgefield

2126 SW Halsey Street
Troutdale
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"From Soil to Cask to Glass: the Mystery of Terroir in the Northern Willamette Valley and the Geology of Winemaking," presented by Dr. Scott Burns.

Dr. Scott Burns, wine expert and professor of geology at Portland State University, explains why the Willamette Valley, one of the top five wine-producing regions in the nation, is an ideal place for growing over 7o varieties of grapes. Join us for history and wine at one of Oregon's homegrown wineries, the McMenamins Edgefield. The evening's presentation will include a wine tasting from the McMenamins' wine cellar. The event is free and open to the public.

SCOTT BURNS is a Professor of Geology and Chair of the Geology Department at Portland State University. He has been teaching at the university level for 39 years and has taught in Switzerland, New Zealand, Washington, Colorado and Louisiana before returning to his native Oregon 19 years ago when he started at Portland State. He is a 6th generation Oregonian. His specialties include natural history, geological hazards (especially earthquakes, landslides, floods, volcanic eruptions, and radon), the Missoula Floods, terroir (the relationship between geology, soils, climate and wines), Quaternary geology, geomorphology, engineering geology, heavy metals in soils, and environmental geology. He is currently working on a book on the Missoula Floods. He lives in Tualatin with Glenda, his wife of 34 years and has three children, Lisa, Doug and Tracy.
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Forest ParkThe OE History Night
Tuesday, April 20, 2010, 7 pm
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse

4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road
Hillsboro
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"Forest Park: the Creation of an Urban Wilderness," presented by Libby Provost

Libby Provost will tell the story of how Forest Park, an urban wilderness of over 5,000 acres, was created in 1948. Listen to how politics, economics, and civic action helped shape one of the most treasured landscapes in Portland.

Libby Provost is an independent historian and researcher in Portland. She has a Master's degree in history from Portland State University, and has presented on Forest Park for the Audubon Society and Friends of Forest Park. Provost tells the story of how Forest Park, an urban wilderness of over 5,000 acres, was created in 1948. Listen to how politics, economics, and civic action helped shape one of the most treasured landscapes in Portland.
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The OE History Night
March 30, 2010
Edgefield 
6:30 p.m.
Sarah Munro on "The Art and Craft of Timberline Lodge"
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Sarah Munro talks about the art and craft of Timberline Lodge. The talk will be accompanied by a slide show featuring photographs from the Oregon Historical Society's archive. Sarah Munro has a B.A. from Pitzer College and an M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. In 2004, through the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission and with the Labor Arts Forum, she helped organize a symposium on New Deal art in Oregon. She is the author of "Timberline Lodge: The History, Art and Craft" of an American Icon, and is the curator of exhibits celebrating the seventy-fifth anniversary of the New Deal at the Oregon Historical Society and Timberline Lodge.
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The OE History Night
Tuesday, March 16, 7 pm
Dr. William Lang on "The Other Oregon Trail"
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse
4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road
Hillsboro, Oregon
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Although much of the Willamette Valley was settled by farming families who followed the Oregon Trail across the plains and over the mountains, the money and influence that helped build Portland came from wealthy businessmen who arrived by ship, sailing around the tip of South America and up the coast. Learn more about this very different journey to Oregon Territory, and how pioneers like Henry Failing and William S. Ladd shaped Portland after stepping off the boat.

William L. Lang is professor of history at Portland State University and the founding director of the Center for Columbia River History. He is the author and editor of many books and articles on the Columbia River and the Pacific Northwest and is co-editor of The Oregon Encyclopedia.
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The OE History Night
February 23, 6:30 pm
Joe Uris on "Portland Vice"
Edgefield
2126 SW Halsey Street
Troutdale, Oregon 
Click here for a Google MapThe OE History Night
February 16, 7:00 pm
"Urban Growth Boundary"
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David Oates, author of City Limits: Walking Portland's Boundary
Cornelius Pass Roadhouse
4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road
Hillsboro, Oregon
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Oregon Encyclopedia - Oregon History and Culture

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